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Summary

Summary

The author of the wildly popular The Kind Worth Killing returns with an electrifying and downright Hitchcockian psychological thriller--as tantalizing as the cinema classics Rear Window and Wait Until Dark--involving a young woman caught in a vise of voyeurism, betrayal, manipulation, and murder.

The danger isn't all in your head . . .

Growing up, Kate Priddy was always a bit neurotic, experiencing momentary bouts of anxiety that exploded into full blown panic attacks after an ex-boyfriend kidnapped her and nearly ended her life. When Corbin Dell, a distant cousin in Boston, suggests the two temporarily swap apartments, Kate, an art student in London, agrees, hoping that time away in a new place will help her overcome the recent wreckage of her life.

But soon after her arrival at Corbin's grand apartment on Beacon Hill, Kate makes a shocking discovery: his next-door neighbor, a young woman named Audrey Marshall, has been murdered. When the police question her about Corbin, a shaken Kate has few answers, and many questions of her own--curiosity that intensifies when she meets Alan Cherney, a handsome, quiet tenant who lives across the courtyard, in the apartment facing Audrey's. Alan saw Corbin surreptitiously come and go from Audrey's place, yet he's denied knowing her. Then, Kate runs into a tearful man claiming to be the dead woman's old boyfriend, who insists Corbin did the deed the night that he left for London.

When she reaches out to her cousin, he proclaims his innocence and calms her nerves . . . until she comes across disturbing objects hidden in the apartment--and accidently learns that Corbin is not where he says he is. Could Corbin be a killer? And what about Alan? Kate finds herself drawn to this appealing man who seems so sincere, yet she isn't sure. Jetlagged and emotionally unstable, her imagination full of dark images caused by the terror of her past, Kate can barely trust herself . . . So how could she take the chance on a stranger she's just met?

Yet the danger Kate imagines isn't nearly as twisted and deadly as what's about to happen. When her every fear becomes very real.

And much, much closer than she thinks.

Told from multiple points of view, Her Every Fear is a scintillating, edgy novel rich with Peter Swanson's chilling insight into the darkest corners of the human psyche and virtuosic skill for plotting that has propelled him to the highest ranks of suspense, in the tradition of such greats as Gillian Flynn, Paula Hawkins, Patricia Highsmith, and James M. Cain.


Author Notes

Peter Swanson, a best-selling author and graduate of Trinity College, the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and Emerson College, is the author of three novels: The Girl With a Clock For a Heart, an LA Times Book Award finalist; The Kind Worth Killing, winner of the New England Society Book Award, and finalist for the CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger; and his most recent, Her Every Fear. His books have been translated into 30 languages.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* London artist Kate Priddy agrees to a temporary apartment swap with her American cousin, hopeful that the move will push her past the crippling fears she's struggled against since she survived an attack by her stalking ex-boyfriend. Kate is certain she has the best of the deal; Corbin Dell's elegant Boston apartment is a far cry from her cramped London flat. But she barely unpacks before detectives arrive to question her about the murder of the woman living across the hall. Corbin claims that he barely knew Audrey Marshall, but Kate doubts his story when she finds Audrey's key hidden in his apartment. As Kate's suspicion mounts, her only friend in Boston, Alan Cherney, confesses that he watched obsessively from his apartment window as Corbin and Audrey developed a secret relationship. When Corbin goes missing in London, Kate becomes the prize in a cat-and-mouse game between killers. The skillfully conjured Boston winter creates the perfect atmosphere for breeding paranoia, which kicks into high gear with the introduction of Cherney's Rear Window-like flashbacks. Swanson established a reputation for complex psychological thrillers with his previous novels (The Kind Worth Killing, 2015, and The Girl with a Clock for a Heart, 2014), but here he introduces a delicious monster-under-the-bed creepiness to the expected top-notch characterization and steadily mounting anxiety.--Tran, Christine Copyright 2016 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Kate Priddy, the heroine of this unconvincing psychological thriller from Swanson (The Kind Worth Killing), who's still traumatized by a boyfriend turned stalker, impulsively agrees to swap her London flat with Corbin Dell, an American cousin she has never met. After a harrowing plane trip and a ride through Boston's Sumner Tunnel that prompts a panic attack, Kate arrives at Corbin's luxurious Beacon Hill apartment just before the discovery of a murder in the apartment next door. The body of book editor Audrey Marshall is marked with gruesome postmortem cuts, which prove to be similar to those of other victims in places where Corbin has lived. Kate begins to suspect that her cousin knows more about Audrey's murder than he claims. As a fragile Kate tries to hold herself together, another stalker targets her. The characters, especially the female ones, rarely make rational decisions, and Kate herself doesn't consistently react in the face of grave danger in the manner of someone suffering from crippling anxiety. Swanson fans will hope for a return to form next time. Agent: Nat Sobel, Sobel Weber Associates. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

When Londoner Kate Priddy reluctantly agrees to a six-month apartment swap with an American second cousin she's never met, she arrives in Boston overloaded with luggage-and more than her share of emotional baggage. She soon learns that her luxurious apartment building is the scene of a homicide and her anxiety accelerates as she regrets her bold transatlantic move. Kate's relentless sleuthing leads her to doubt her cousin Corbin's innocence when she makes a few questionable discoveries in his apartment. As Kate pushes herself to acclimate to her new American life, she uncovers more inconsistencies related to the homicide and further suspects Corbin and several other people in her new social circle. Is she simply an anxious woman with an overactive imagination, or is there something sinister lurking in her world? VERDICT Psychological thriller devotees should block time to read Swanson's (The Kind Worth Killing) novel in one sitting, preferably in the daylight. Readers can expect the hairs on their necks to stand straight up as they are consumed with a full-blown case of heebie-jeebies. [See Prepub Alert, 7/18/16.]-Mary Todd Chesnut, Northern Kentucky Univ. Lib., Highland Heights © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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