Cover image for There will be no miracles here
Title:
There will be no miracles here
Author:
Gerald, Casey, author.
ISBN:
9780735214200
Personal Author:
Physical Description:
394 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Abstract:
"Casey Gerald comes to our fractured times as a uniquely visionary witness whose life has spanned seemingly unbridgeable divides. His story begins at the end of the world: Dallas, New Year's Eve 1999, when he gathers with the congregation of his grandfather's black evangelical church to see which of them will be carried off. His beautiful, fragile mother disappears frequently and mysteriously; for a brief idyll, he and his sister live like Boxcar Children on her disability checks. When Casey--following in the footsteps of his father, a gridiron legend who literally broke his back for the team--is recruited to play football at Yale, he enters a world he's never dreamed of, the anteroom to secret societies and success on Wall Street, in Washington, and beyond. But even as he attains the inner sanctums of power, Casey sees how the world crushes those who live at its margins. He sees how the elite perpetuate the salvation stories that keep others from rising. And he sees, most painfully, how his own ascension is part of the scheme."-- Book jacket.
Personal Subject:

Available:*

Library
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Call Number
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Cuba Circulating Library Association 1 BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY B GERALD New NonFiction Book
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Cuba Circulating Library Association 1 B GERALD Not Yet Available
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Elmira - Steele Memorial Library 1 B GERALD New NonFiction Book
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Summary

Summary

NAMED A BEST BOOK OF 2018 BY NPR AND THE NEW YORK TIMES
A PBS NEWSHOUR - NEW YORK TIMES BOOK CLUB PICK

"Somehow Casey Gerald has pulled off the most urgently political, most deeply personal, and most engagingly spiritual statement of our time by just looking outside his window and inside himself. Extraordinary." - Marlon James

"Staccato prose and peripatetic storytelling combine the cadences of the Bible with an urgency reminiscent of James Baldwin in this powerfully emotional memoir." - BookPage

The testament of a boy and a generation who came of age as the world came apart--a generation searching for a new way to live.

Casey Gerald comes to our fractured times as a uniquely visionary witness whose life has spanned seemingly unbridgeable divides. His story begins at the end of the world: Dallas, New Year's Eve 1999, when he gathers with the congregation of his grandfather's black evangelical church to see which of them will be carried off. His beautiful, fragile mother disappears frequently and mysteriously; for a brief idyll, he and his sister live like Boxcar Children on her disability checks. When Casey--following in the footsteps of his father, a gridiron legend who literally broke his back for the team--is recruited to play football at Yale, he enters a world he's never dreamed of, the anteroom to secret societies and success on Wall Street, in Washington, and beyond. But even as he attains the inner sanctums of power, Casey sees how the world crushes those who live at its margins. He sees how the elite perpetuate the salvation stories that keep others from rising. And he sees, most painfully, how his own ascension is part of the scheme.

There Will Be No Miracles Here has the arc of a classic rags-to-riches tale, but it stands the American Dream narrative on its head. If to live as we are is destroying us, it asks, what would it mean to truly live? Intense, incantatory, shot through with sly humor and quiet fury, There Will Be No Miracles Here inspires us to question--even shatter--and reimagine our most cherished myths.


Author Notes

Casey Gerald grew up in Oak Cliff, Texas and went to Yale, where he majored in political science and played varsity football. After receiving an MBA from Harvard Business School, he cofounded MBAs Across America. He has been featured on MSNBC, at TED and SXSW, on the cover of Fast Company , and in The New York Times, Financial Times , and The Guardian , among others.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* Gerald opens his memoir by describing himself at age 12, sitting in a church pew in great anticipation of the impending Rapture. When the clock turns and 1999 becomes 2000 and he and his fellow congregants remain, is he relieved, or disappointed? Gerald then looks back at the beginning, as he remembers it. His mother struggled with mental illness and disappeared before he was a teenager, while addiction gripped his father, an Ohio State football legend, leaving Gerald in the rotating care of his fierce older sister, his grandmothers, and other family and friends in his Dallas neighborhood. He became a star student and football player in high school before excelling, on the field and off, at Yale, where his accent and baggy clothes are the first, and not nearly the last, things that separate him from his peers. Gerald pulls no punches in telling his extraordinary story, which he relates with unsparing truth, no small amount of feeling, and a complete lack of sentimentality. Painful lessons dart in and pummel his unsuspecting self, and scenes of startling intensity are often pierced and pieced back together by light and humor. Also an accomplished public speaker, Gerald will hook readers with richly layered writing on poverty, progress, race, belief, and the actual American Dream.--Annie Bostrom Copyright 2018 Booklist


Library Journal Review

Reflecting on subjects such as race, religion, manhood, sexuality, poverty, and politics, Gerald (cofounder, MBAs Across America) brings readers into his life as he waits for the rapture of Y2K, the supposed end of the world. When that doesn't happen, he ruminates on his childhood as a "nobody in a family big on somebodys"-attending his grandpa's church, living in his dad's shadow, and coming to terms with his mom's absence. His writings range from meditations on whether he was living in sin for questioning his faith and hiding his sexuality to observations on playing football in high school and college in order to fulfill the family legacy. The strongest chapters look back at the author's time at Yale University, sparing his family the racism he experienced as well as the isolation that came along with being a black gay man in a predominantly white space. Later sections detailing his foray into investment banking and politics sometimes struggle to maintain the momentum, but Gerald still manages to draw us in, haunted by the death of a friend and the loneliness of failed relationships. VERDICT Similar to Kiese Laymon's Heavy, Gerald's work offers a wide-ranging, hard-to-define memoir of family, identity, and belonging.-Stephanie Sendaula, Library Journal © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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