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Alfred Box of Books Library 1 E C Juvenile Fiction Book
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Big Flats Library 1 E C Juvenile Fiction Book
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Branchport - Modeste Bedient Memorial Library 1 E C Juvenile Fiction Book
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Cuba Circulating Library Association 1 E SCIENCE (PETS) C Juvenile Fiction Book
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Elmira - Steele Memorial Library 1 E C Juvenile Fiction Book
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Horseheads Free Library 1 E C Juvenile Fiction Book
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Odessa - Dutton S. Peterson Memorial Library 1 E C Juvenile Fiction Book
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Southern Tier Library System 1 E C Rotating Collection Items
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Wellsville - David A. Howe Public Library 1 E C Juvenile Fiction Book
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Summary

Summary

There was a cat who lived alone.Until the daya new cat came . . . And so a story of friendship begins, following two cats through their days, months, and years until one day, the older cat has to go. And he doesn't come back.This is a poignant story, told in measured text and bold black-and-white illustrations about life and the act of moving on.


Author Notes

Elisha Cooper is the award-winning author of many books for young readers. Big Cat, Little Cat is Elisha's first book with Roaring Brook Press. He lives with his family and two cats in New York City. elishacooper.com


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

It's all about simple text and clean lines in this picture book about feline camaraderie. Cooper certainly loves and understands cat behavior, as exemplified in his various poses of cats at rest and in action. A big cat (white) welcomes a new little cat (black) to the household, and shows it when to eat, when to drink, where to go, how to be, and when to rest. The white cat is outlined in black lines on generous white space as the two partake in these activities; the black cat is profiled in silhouette, with only one tiny white dot for an eye. As the years go by, the black cat grows bigger, and eventually the white cat has to go. A silhouetted family mourn along with the black cat. But soon a little white cat arrives, and the now-big black cat teaches it all the same lessons. In a final double-page spread the two dream happily, completing the concept of the circle of life in loving contentment.--Gepson, Lolly Copyright 2017 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Like a Japanese brush painter, Cooper (8: An Animal Alphabet) uses bold, black lines to trace the outlines of a white cat; it roams through an apartment, playing with yarn and gazing at the bird feeder. Then a black kitten arrives, and the white cat shows it "when to eat, when to drink, where to go, how to be." "Big cat, little cat," Cooper writes as the two sleep embraced, their curves a rhythmic composition of black and white. The two grow ever closer until, with little warning, the white cat "got older, and one day he had to go... and didn't come back. And that was hard. For everyone." The black cat is pictured alone on the page; the next spread pulls back to reveal its human family, all bereft. Even younger readers will understand their grief. But when a white kitten arrives, the story begins again: "The cat showed the new cat what to do. When to eat, when to drink, where to go, how to be." With quiet grace, Cooper delivers the message that love persists through loss. Ages 3-6. Agent: Liz Darhansoff, Darhansoff & Verrill. (Mar.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-Bold and simple illustrations perfectly depict life with cats. Elegant, expressive black line drawings on white backgrounds capture the essence of all things feline and call to mind the work of Clare Turlay Newberry and Nikki McClure. The book follows a lone white cat who gains a small black companion, their life together, and the eventual loss of the elder cat ("Years went by-and more years, too-") and ends with the addition of a new kitten. The spare text does an excellent job of conveying the story from the animals' point of view. Readers are told that "the older cat got older and one day he had to go...and didn't come back. And that was hard. For everyone." VERDICT A gentle, loving look at the life cycle of pets; young readers will be able to gain confidence in retelling the story using the text and the pictures. A must-have for all collections.-Paige Mellinger, Gwinnett County Public Library, Lawrenceville, GA © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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