Available:*

Library
Copy
Call Number
Material Type
Status
Alfred Box of Books Library 1 YA Y Juvenile Fiction Book
Searching...
Corning - Southeast Steuben County Library 1 YA FIC YOO Juvenile Fiction Book
Searching...
Cuba Circulating Library Association 1 YA YOO Juvenile Fiction Book
Searching...
Elmira - Steele Memorial Library 1 J Y Juvenile Fiction Book
Searching...
Hornell Public Library 1 Y YOO Juvenile Fiction Book
Searching...
Horseheads Free Library 1 J Y Juvenile Fiction Book
Searching...
Montour Falls Memorial Library 1 YA Y Juvenile Fiction Book
Searching...
Prattsburgh Library 1 YA FIC YOO New Juvenile Fiction
Searching...
Wayland Free Library 1 YA YOO Juvenile Fiction Book
Searching...
Wellsville - David A. Howe Public Library 1 YA Y Juvenile Fiction Book
Searching...
West Elmira Library 1 J Y Juvenile Fiction Book
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

The Instant  New York Times Bestseller! Soon to be a Major Motion Picture!

The dazzling new novel from Nicola Yoon, the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Everything, Everything (in theaters May 2017!),   will have you falling in love with Natasha and Daniel as they fall in love with each other!

Natasha: I'm a girl who believes in science and facts. Not fate. Not destiny. Or dreams that will never come true. I'm definitely not the kind of girl who meets a cute boy on a crowded New York City street and falls in love with him. Not when my family is twelve hours away from being deported to Jamaica. Falling in love with him won't be my story.

Daniel:  I've always been the good son, the good student, living up to my parents' high expectations. Never the poet. Or the dreamer. But when I see her, I forget about all that. Something about Natasha makes me think that fate has something much more extraordinary in store--for both of us.

The Universe:  Every moment in our lives has brought us to this single moment. A million futures lie before us. Which one will come true?

***

A 2016 National Book Award Finalist
A New York Times Notable Book
A BuzzFeed Best YA Book of the Year
A POPSUGAR Best Book of the Year
A Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year
A Kirkus Reviews Best Book of the Year
A Booklist Editor's Choice
A New York Public Library Best Book for Teens
An Amazon Best Book of the Year

" Beautifully crafted ."-- People Magazine

"A book that is very much about the many factors that affect falling in love, as much as it is about the very act itself . . . fans of Yoon's first novel, Everything Everything , will find much to love --if not, more--in what is easily an even stronger follow up." -- Entertainment Weekly

" Transcends the limits of YA as a human story about falling in love and seeking out our futures." --POPSUGAR.com

★ "An exhilarating, hopeful novel exploring identity, family, the love of science and the science of love, dark matter and interconnectedness--is about seeing and being seen and the possibility of love... a nd it shines."  -- Shelf Awareness, starred review 
 
★ "Moving and suspenseful ." -- Publishers Weekly , starred review 

★ "Fans of Eleanor & Park and The Fault in Our Stars  are destined to fall for Daniel and Natasha ." -- The Horn Book , starred review

★ "Lyrical and sweeping, full of hope, heartbreak, fate . . . and the universal beating of the human heart." -- Booklist , starred review

★" Profound . . . both deeply moving and satisfying."-- Kirkus , starred review 

★"A love story that is smart without being cynical, heartwarming without being cloying, and schmaltzy in all the best ways ." -- The Bulletin , starred review 

"This wistful love story will be adored by fans of Rainbow Rowell's Eleanor & Park." --SLJ

Praise for Everything, Everything :

"[A] fresh, moving debut." -- Entertainment Weekly

" Gorgeous and lyrical ." -- The New York Times Book Review

" Will give you butterflies ." -- Seventeen

 "A do-not-miss for fans of John Green and Rainbow Rowell (aka everyone)." -- Justine

 "YA book lovers, your newest obsession is here."--MTV.com


Author Notes

Nicola Yoon grew up in Jamaica and Brooklyn. Her first novel Everything, Everything was published in 2015 and became a New York Times bestseller.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* On a summer morning in New York City, Daniel and Natasha wake up as strangers. This is a day that could catapult their lives into entirely new directions that neither of them wants to take. Natasha has only hours left to prevent her family's deportation to Jamaica, after a minor legal infraction jeopardizes their stay in the U.S. Daniel dreads sealing his fate with an alumni interview that will pave his way to a career in medicine, as his Korean family expects. Despite a day packed with Natasha's desperate race against time and a tangled system, and Daniel's difficult tug-of-war between familial pressures and autonomy, love finds a way in, takes hold, and changes them both forever. Yoon's sophomore effort (Everything, Everything, 2015) is carefully plotted and distinctly narrated in Natasha's and Daniel's voices; yet it also allows space for the lives that are swirling around them, from security guards to waitresses to close relatives. It's lyrical and sweeping, full of hope, heartbreak, fate, and free will. It encompasses the cultural specifics of diverse New York City communities and the universal beating of the human heart. Every day like every book begins full of possibility, but this one holds more than others. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Yoon's debut became a best-seller, so the publisher is giving this a strong push that includes a national author tour.--Booth, Heather Copyright 2016 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Is it fate or chance that brings people together? This is the question posed in this impressively multilayered tale of a one-day romance featuring practical Natasha, whose family is facing deportation to Jamaica, and Daniel, a first-generation Korean American with a poet's sensibility. The teens' eventful day begins at a New York City record store, where they see someone shoplifting. It's the first of many significant moments that occur as Natasha desperately seeks aid to stay in America and Daniel prepares for a college interview with a Yale alum. Drawn together, separated, and converging again, both teens recognize with startling clarity that they are falling in love. With a keen eye for detail and a deep understanding of every character she introduces, Yoon (Everything, Everything) weaves an intricate web of threads connecting strangers as she delves into the personal histories of her protagonists, as well as the emotions and conflicts of others who cross their paths. A moving and suspenseful portrayal of a fleeting relationship. Ages 12-up. Agent: Sara Shandler and Joelle Hobeika, Alloy Entertainment. (Nov.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 8 Up-It is Natasha's last day in New York City, where she has lived for 10 years. Her family, living as undocumented immigrants in a small Brooklyn apartment, are being deported to Jamaica after her father's arrest for drunk driving. Natasha is scouring the city for a chance to stay in the United States legally. She wants the normal teen existence of her peers. Meanwhile, poetic Daniel is on his way to an interview as part of his application process to Yale. He is under great pressure to get in because his parents (who emigrated from South Korea) are adamant that he become a doctor. Events slowly conspire to bring the two leads together. When Daniel and Natasha finally meet, he falls in love immediately and convinces her to join him for the day. They tell their stories in alternating chapters. Additional voices are integrated into the book as characters interact with them. Both relatable and profound, the bittersweet ending conveys a sense of hopefulness that will resonate with teens. VERDICT This wistful love story will be adored by fans of Rainbow Rowell's Eleanor & Park and by those who enjoyed the unique narrative structure of A.S. King's Please Ignore Vera Dietz.-Kristin Anderson, Columbus Metropolitan Library System, OH © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

  prologue     CARL SAGAN SAID that if you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe. When he says "from scratch," he means from nothing . He means from a time before the world even existed. If you want to make an apple pie from nothing at all, you have to start with the Big Bang and expanding universes, neutrons, ions, atoms, black holes, suns, moons, ocean tides, the Milky Way, Earth, evolution, dinosaurs, extinction-level events, platypuses, Homo erectus , Cro-Magnon man, etc. You have to start at the beginning. You must invent fire. You need water and fertile soil and seeds. You need cows and people to milk them and more people to churn that milk into butter. You need wheat and sugar cane and apple trees. You need chemistry and biology. For a really good apple pie, you need the arts. For an apple pie that can last for generations, you need the printing press and the Industrial Revolution and maybe even a poem.     To make a thing as simple as an apple pie, you have to create the whole wide world.     daniel     Local Teen Accepts Destiny, Agrees to Become Doctor, Stereotype     It's Charlie's fault that my summer (and now fall) has been one absurd headline after another. Charles Jae Won Bae, aka Charlie, my older brother, firstborn son of a firstborn son, surprised my parents (and all their friends, and the entire gossiping Korean community of Flushing, New York) by getting kicked out of Harvard University ( Best School , my mother said, when his acceptance letter arrived). Now he's been kicked out of Best School , and all summer my mom frowns and doesn't quite believe and doesn't quite understand.     Why you grades so bad? They kick you out? Why they kick you out? Why not make you stay and study more?     My dad says, Not kick out. Require to withdraw. Not the same as kick out.     Charlie grumbles: It's just temporary, only for two semesters .     Under this unholy barrage of my parents' confusion and shame and disappointment, even I almost feel bad for Charlie. Almost.     natasha   MY MOM SAYS IT'S TIME for me to give up now, and that what I'm doing is futile. She's upset, so her accent is thicker than usual, and every statement is a question.     "You no think is time for you to give up now, Tasha? You no think that what you doing is futile?"     She draws out the first syllable of futile for a second too long. My dad doesn't say anything. He's mute with anger or impotence. I'm never sure which. His frown is so deep and so complete that it's hard to imagine his face with another expression. If this were even just a few months ago, I'd be sad to see him like this, but now I don't really care. He's the reason we're all in this mess.     Peter, my nine-year-old brother, is the only one of us happy with this turn of events. Right now, he's packing his suitcase and playing "No Woman, No Cry" by Bob Marley. "Old- school packing music," he called it.     Despite the fact that he was born here in America, Peter says he wants to live in Jamaica. He's always been pretty shy and has a hard time making friends. I think he imagines that Jamaica will be a paradise and that, somehow, things will be better for him there.     The four of us are in the living room of our one-bedroom apartment. The living room doubles as a bedroom, and Peter and I share it. It has two small sofa beds that we pull out at night, and a bright blue curtain down the middle for privacy. Right now the curtain is pulled aside so you can see both our halves at once.     It's pretty easy to guess which one of us wants to leave and which wants to stay. My side still looks lived-in. My books are on my small IKEA shelf. My favorite picture of me and my best friend, Bev, is still sitting on my desk. We're wearing safety goggles and sexy-pouting at the camera in physics lab. The safety goggles were my idea. The sexy-pouting was hers. I haven't removed a single item of clothing from my dresser. I haven't even taken down my NASA star map poster. It's huge--actually eight posters that I taped together--and shows all the major stars, constellations, and sections of the Milky Way visible from the Northern Hemisphere. It even has instructions on how to find Polaris and navigate your way by stars in case you get lost. The poster tubes I bought for packing it are leaning unopened against the wall.     On Peter's side, virtually all the surfaces are bare, most of his possessions already packed away into boxes and suitcases.     My mom is right, of course--what I'm doing is futile. Still, I grab my headphones, my physics textbook, and some comics. If I have time to kill, maybe I can finish up my homework and read.     Peter shakes his head at me. "Why are you bringing that?" he asks, meaning the textbook. "We're leaving, Tasha. You don't have to turn in homework ."     Peter has just discovered the power of sarcasm. He uses it every chance he gets.     I don't bother responding to him, just put my headphones on and head for the door. "Back soon," I say to my mom.     She kisses her teeth and turns away. I remind myself that she's not upset with me. Tasha, is not you me upset with, you know? is something she says a lot these days. I'm going to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) building in downtown Manhattan to see if someone there can help me. We are undocumented immigrants, and we're being deported tonight.     Today is my last chance to try to convince someone--or fate--to help me find a way to stay in America.     To be clear: I don't believe in fate. But I'm desperate. Excerpted from The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.


Google Preview

Select a list
Make this your default list.
The following items were successfully added.
    There was an error while adding the following items. Please try again.