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Big Flats Library 1 J G Juvenile Fiction Book
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Cuba Circulating Library Association 1 J GEO Juvenile Fiction Book
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Elmira - Steele Memorial Library 1 J G Juvenile Fiction Book
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Montour Falls Memorial Library 1 YA G Juvenile Fiction Book
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Rushville - Mabel D. Blodgett Memorial Library 1 J G Non barcoded items at offline libraries
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Wellsville - David A. Howe Public Library 1 J G Juvenile Fiction Book
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Summary

Summary

A bright, bold debut about a girl who was born a boy, but refuses to let that stand in the way of her dream.

More than anything else, George wants to play Charlotte in her fourth-grade class's production of Charlotte's Web. The problem is, her teacher won't let her, because George is a boy. But George isn't about to let that squash her dream. With the help of her best friend, George must learn to stand up for her wish - and brave a few bullies along the way.

Transcending all categories and genres,George is a pertinent and poignant middle-grade read for kids of all backgrounds.


Author Notes

Alex Gino is a tutor and volunteer in LGBTQI centers in Oakland, California. George is his first novel.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* Ten-year-old George has a secret. Everyone thinks she is a boy, but inside she knows that she is really a girl named Melissa. When her fourth-grade class prepares to mount a dramatic production of Charlotte's Web, George knows that more than anything in the world, she wants to play the part of Charlotte. After all, who cares if she plays a girl's part? Hasn't her best friend Kelly told her that, in Shakespeare's time, men played all the parts, even those of girls and women? But things aren't that simple, not even when George summons the courage to dramatically show her single-parent mom the truth. Gino's debut novel is a sensitive, insightful portrayal of a transgender child coming to terms with gender identity. George is an appealing, thoroughly believable character, and her best friend Kelly adds humor and zest to this gentle story. Gino does an excellent job introducing factual information into the narrative without impinging upon the accessible and appealing story. Pair this important addition to the slender but growing body of transgender fiction with Ami Polonsky's Gracefully Grayson (2014).--Cart, Michael Copyright 2015 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Though others see her as male, 10-year-old George has long known that she is a girl, and she longs for people to see that truth, even while the idea terrifies her. When George's fourth-grade class has tryouts for a school production of Charlotte's Web, George desperately wants to play Charlotte, a character she adores. George's teacher doesn't allow to George to audition for the part, but her supportive best friend Kelly, who is cast as Charlotte, comes up with a plan that may give George the chance she needs. The taunts of a school bully, George's self-doubts, and her mother's inability to truly hear what George is telling her carry real weight as debut author Gino's simple, direct writing illuminates George's struggles and quiet strength. George's joy during stolen moments when she can be herself will resonate with anyone who has felt different, while providing a necessary window into the specific challenges of a child recognizing that they are transgender. Profound, moving, and-as Charlotte would say-radiant, this book will stay with anyone lucky enough to find it. Ages 8-12. Agent: Jennifer Laughran, Andrea Brown Literary Agency. (Aug.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-Melissa is in fourth grade. She has a best friend named Kelly. Melissa loves fashion magazines and playing Mario Kart with her older brother, Scott. And, more than anything, she wants to play Charlotte in the school play, Charlotte's Web. Unfortunately, the world sees Melissa as George, not as the girl she is. Melissa doesn't wonder if she is transgender; she wonders how to explain that to the world. Reactions of those around Melissa range from Kelly's supportive friendship to her teacher's judgmental attitude. Well-meaning comments from her mother remind listeners of the impact of words. As Melissa struggles with bullying, listeners will find themselves championing her. While filling a niche in the middle-grade LGBTQ+ literary canon, this work transcends issues and stereotypes and speaks to friendship, kindness and acceptance. Melissa's story of self-advocacy demands a response from listeners. The honesty and straightforwardness of the text allows for everyone to find their own reflections in the novel. Providing an impetus for discussion, Melissa's journey demands growth from the listener-the most noble of all demands from a book. Jamie Clayton, an outstanding actress and voice in the trans community, delivers a sensitive reading. VERDICT This is a brave and necessary choice for the school library. Not only does this book fill a niche that is much needed, but it is an amazing story of friendship and a tribute to how we should be living our lives: authentically. ["A required purchase for any collection that serves a middle grade population": SLJ 7/15 starred review of the Scholastic book.]-Terri Perper, Olney Elementary School, MD © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

From George George reached the end of Charlotte's monologue and was ready for the dialogue with Wilbur that followed. But George didn't hear her cue. She opened her eyes. Ms. Udell was frowning, and a thick crease had formed across her forehead. "George, what was that?" she asked. "I . . . ," started George, but there were no words to finish the sentence. "I . . ." "Was that supposed to be some kind of joke? Because it wasn't very funny." "It wasn't a joke. I want to be Charlotte." George's voice sounded much smaller now that she was speaking her own words. "You know I can't very well cast you as Charlotte. I have too many girls who want the part. Besides, imagine how confused people would be. Now, if you're interested in being Wilbur, that's a possibility. Or maybe Templeton--he's a funny guy." "No, thanks. I just . . . I wanted . . ." Excerpted from George by Alex Gino All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.


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