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Big Flats Library 1 J G Juvenile Fiction Book
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Cuba Circulating Library Association 1 J GEO Juvenile Fiction Book
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Elmira - Steele Memorial Library 1 J G Juvenile Fiction Book
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Horseheads Free Library 1 J G Juvenile Fiction Book
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Montour Falls Memorial Library 1 YA G Juvenile Fiction Book
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Rushville - Mabel D. Blodgett Memorial Library 1 J G Non barcoded items at offline libraries
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Wellsville - David A. Howe Public Library 1 J G New Juvenile Fiction
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Summary

Summary

A bright, bold debut about a girl who was born a boy, but refuses to let that stand in the way of her dream.

More than anything else, George wants to play Charlotte in her fourth-grade class's production of Charlotte's Web. The problem is, her teacher won't let her, because George is a boy. But George isn't about to let that squash her dream. With the help of her best friend, George must learn to stand up for her wish - and brave a few bullies along the way.

Transcending all categories and genres,George is a pertinent and poignant middle-grade read for kids of all backgrounds.


Author Notes

Alex Gino is a tutor and volunteer in LGBTQI centers in Oakland, California. George is his first novel.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* Ten-year-old George has a secret. Everyone thinks she is a boy, but inside she knows that she is really a girl named Melissa. When her fourth-grade class prepares to mount a dramatic production of Charlotte's Web, George knows that more than anything in the world, she wants to play the part of Charlotte. After all, who cares if she plays a girl's part? Hasn't her best friend Kelly told her that, in Shakespeare's time, men played all the parts, even those of girls and women? But things aren't that simple, not even when George summons the courage to dramatically show her single-parent mom the truth. Gino's debut novel is a sensitive, insightful portrayal of a transgender child coming to terms with gender identity. George is an appealing, thoroughly believable character, and her best friend Kelly adds humor and zest to this gentle story. Gino does an excellent job introducing factual information into the narrative without impinging upon the accessible and appealing story. Pair this important addition to the slender but growing body of transgender fiction with Ami Polonsky's Gracefully Grayson (2014).--Cart, Michael Copyright 2015 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Though others see her as male, 10-year-old George has long known that she is a girl, and she longs for people to see that truth, even while the idea terrifies her. When George's fourth-grade class has tryouts for a school production of Charlotte's Web, George desperately wants to play Charlotte, a character she adores. George's teacher doesn't allow to George to audition for the part, but her supportive best friend Kelly, who is cast as Charlotte, comes up with a plan that may give George the chance she needs. The taunts of a school bully, George's self-doubts, and her mother's inability to truly hear what George is telling her carry real weight as debut author Gino's simple, direct writing illuminates George's struggles and quiet strength. George's joy during stolen moments when she can be herself will resonate with anyone who has felt different, while providing a necessary window into the specific challenges of a child recognizing that they are transgender. Profound, moving, and-as Charlotte would say-radiant, this book will stay with anyone lucky enough to find it. Ages 8-12. Agent: Jennifer Laughran, Andrea Brown Literary Agency. (Aug.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-Before her mother and older brother Scott come home, George has a few, treasured moments to experience life as she's always wanted to live it. She looks in the mirror and calls herself Melissa, combs her hair over her forehead to mimic the appearance of bangs, and reads glossy magazines full of ads for lipstick, perfume, and tampons. Once her mom and brother come home, however, the magazines must go back to their secret hiding place. While George has no doubt she's a girl, her family relates to her as they always have: as a boy. George hopes that if she can secure the role of Charlotte in her class's upcoming production of Charlotte's Web, her mom will finally see her as a girl and be able to come to terms with the fact that George is transgender. With the help of her closest ally, Kelly, George attempts to get the rest of the world to accept her as she is. While children can have a sense of their gender identity as early as the age of three, children's literature is shockingly bereft of trans* protagonists, especially where middle grade literature is concerned. George offers more than the novelty of an LGBTQ coming-out story, however. Here, what is most remarkable is the use of pronouns: While the world interacts with George as if she is a boy, the narrator only refers to her with female pronouns, which gives her girl-ness a stronger sense of validation. In addition, George comments on the fact that, in past years, gays and lesbians have achieved a certain amount of visibility and acceptance, while the trans* community is still largely ignored and misunderstood. George's mother remarks that while she can handle having a gay child, she simply can't accept her as "that kind of gay." For George, as is the case for many LGBTQ youth, coming out is a process that she must repeat until she is properly recognized. There is pain in George, but not without the promise of a better tomorrow, even if tomorrow doesn't arrive as soon as it should. VERDICT A required purchase for any collection that serves a middle grade population.-Ingrid Abrams, Brooklyn Public Library, NY © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

From George George reached the end of Charlotte's monologue and was ready for the dialogue with Wilbur that followed. But George didn't hear her cue. She opened her eyes. Ms. Udell was frowning, and a thick crease had formed across her forehead. "George, what was that?" she asked. "I . . . ," started George, but there were no words to finish the sentence. "I . . ." "Was that supposed to be some kind of joke? Because it wasn't very funny." "It wasn't a joke. I want to be Charlotte." George's voice sounded much smaller now that she was speaking her own words. "You know I can't very well cast you as Charlotte. I have too many girls who want the part. Besides, imagine how confused people would be. Now, if you're interested in being Wilbur, that's a possibility. Or maybe Templeton--he's a funny guy." "No, thanks. I just . . . I wanted . . ." Excerpted from George by Alex Gino All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.


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